Sim Therapy

Sim Therapy



Simulations, also known as sims, enjoy the distinction of being both games and educational aids. The U.S. Army develops and uses computer sim games for training, many of which are available for civilians. Aside from combat training, a sim can teach you how to drive a car, pilot a helicopter, operate a carnival, and manage a baseball franchise. Maybe someone can develop sims to train people how to behave in real life.

Sim Therapy

Forget The Sims; I'm talking about real life lessons embedded in a game. Sim therapy. For lasting impact, there has to be a prime motivator. And I can't think of anything better than fear. Fear of pain, fear of loss, fear of embarrassment, and fear for the sake of fear will snap reprobates into shape right quick. Since fear has been taken out of the educational system, it must be assimilated into another system to "fine-tune" those that may not have much experience with its effectiveness.

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So what do we hope to cure with the new fear sims? How about bullying, lethargy, antisocial behavior, and general stupidity? It's unlikely that participants would sign up voluntarily, especially if there are real risks involved. Real risks are essential to the learning experience, which is essentially the old fashioned reward/punishment system. Participants would have to risk their jobs, finances, living quarters, personal relationships, health, and peace of mind.

Sim Therapy

So how are you going to get willing players? Who said they have to be willing? Have offenders court-ordered to participate, or introduce licensing for various real life activities. For instance, have a license for dating. Guys will not be allowed to ask girls out without such a license. The only way you can get a license is to pass the dating sim. Failure to do so will result in heavy fines, imprisonment, and perhaps a life of celibacy; although many gamers are already familiar with the latter.

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