Top 10 Games That Need HD Remakes

Top 10 Games That Need HD Remakes




Ōkami
Ōkami

Ōkami hit the PlayStation 2 in 2006, and was ported to the Wii in 2008, all during a period in which the redundancy of many genres was become apparent to the gaming audience. It shocked me that this gorgeous game didn't sell better, despite critical acclaim. The cel-shaded visuals had a very specific Japanese art style and there were a lot of gameplay influences from Legend of Zelda, making Ōkami a delight to both play and see. It looked great at the time, but an HD remake could really do justice to the original aesthetic.

We were excited just this past month when Capcom announced a high-def remastered port coming to the PS3. It will have Move support (which will hopefully work better than the Wii version did), boast a nice Trophy list, and be easily accessible through the PlayStation Network (hopefully for a reasonable price). If you missed Ōkami years ago, I urge you to give the upcoming remake a strong look.



Blast Corps
Blast Corps

One of the best demolition games ever made, the objective was simple: clear a path for a nuclear bomb strapped to a slowly moving vehicle. If the nuke touches anything, the world goes, "BOOM!" The game had silky smooth controls (a rarity for 3D games of the time) and a diverse array of vehicles, each with unique destructive capabilities. But while nearly everything on the stages could be completely obliterated, they simply evaporated in a pixelated, geometric mess. Some great stuff could be done with explosion effects and modern gaming physics, so please rebuild this gem so we can knock it down. "Time to get moving".



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Deus Ex
Deus Ex

The original title—and last year's sequel, Deus Ex: Human Revolution—followed a great set of plotlines filled with corporate power and political strife, along with many interesting gameplay mechanics with the near-future biotechnological breakthrough in human enhancements. All the conventions that core gamers love were present: smooth combat, great roleplaying, and plenty of hacking tools. The visuals were actually pretty good for the time, but the game still had lots of sterile environments and fine detailing only on certain items. The menus were stuffed to the gills with information and text, something that could be easily streamlined with today's technology. Perhaps pairing it with the second title of the series, Invisible War, would entice the Human Revolution owners to turn their single title into a trilogy.



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