Top 10 Swordsmen

Top 10 Swordsmen




Auron (Final Fantasy X)
Auron (Final Fantasy X)

There are many swordsmen in the Final Fantasy series, including the protagonist of almost every entry. From swords bigger than the men who wield them to those with gun components built in, the variety has been immense. If we're looking at the best swordsmen, though, few have the poise and presence of Auron. The calm resolve with which he faces monstrous foes and the strength with which he can wield his blade (even one-handed, if so desired) both go toward earning him a spot on this list above his Final Fantasy cohorts. Especially Tidus.



Link (The Legend of Zelda)
Link (The Legend of Zelda)

If we're making a list about swordsmen, how could we leave off the one whose entire series is focused around a sword? The Master Sword, one might argue, is the true hero of the Zelda franchise, passed down through the generations of heroes from Link to Link, each of whom wields it bravely in the face of evil opposition. That said, the sword cannot swing itself, and Link bears it bravely and masterfully, cutting down swaths of foes who would stand between him and rescuing the princess Zelda and defeating the evil Ganon. Plus, dude plays an instrument. Probably gets tons of digits.



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Frog (Chrono Trigger)
Frog (Chrono Trigger)

Frog is the depressed, cursed hero of medieval Guardia. He is also the bearer of the Masamune, which, following in Square tradition, is a blade of immense power. One of the first things Frog does upon receiving it is use it to split open a mountain, gaining access to Magus' lair. He is fearless and steadfast, combining his abilities with those of Chrono to strike down enemies. Despite his original form as a human, he has no qualms in using his new, amphibious body to further enhance his attacks, giving him a range advantage most swordsmen would kill for. That said, he plays the vigilant knight to an incredible peak, and manages to be humble despite his incredible skill. When he compliments Chrono on his swordsmanship, it comes across as a true statement of respect, rather than one of awe, and that, right there, is telling.



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