Uncharted on Film: Do It Right Or Go Home

Uncharted on Film: Do It Right Or Go Home



Kicking off the month with an interview in the LA Times, David O. Russell, the writer and director of Sony's Uncharted film, said he has a really great idea for his spin on the upcoming adaptation.

"This idea that really turns me on is that there's a family that's a force to be reckoned with in the world of international art and antiquities," Russell said. "[A family] that deals with heads of state and heads of museums and metes out justice."

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We all know it's not uncommon for game canon to receive drastic alterations or to be abandoned altogether when it's adapted for mass celluloid consumption. That's not what is so profoundly asinine about Russell's idea. When Russell initially backed out of the project earlier this year over an inability to come to an agreement with studio heads, there was some semblance of a script already started—one that supposedly was a loose adaptation of Drake's Fortune, which involved modern-day fortune and glory hound Nathan Drake's quest to find the lost city of El Dorado. The screenwriters rumored to be attached to the project were perhaps a dubious lot, but taking cues from Naughty Dog's original script and the bizarre indie-leaning directorial choice of Russell seemed to suggest that perhaps Sony was actually taking Uncharted seriously.

Uncharted on Film: Do It Right Or Go Home

However, when he later came back on as director, Russell was also now penning a script himself. And when he revealed what his intentions were with its narrative (which is rumored to star Mark Wahlberg as Drake as well as Joe Pesci and Robert DeNiro as his uncle and father respectively), he's made it pretty clear that he has absolutely no idea what Uncharted—a series about a smartass, globe-trotting treasure hunter searching for legendary artifacts from throughout antiquity—is all about.

Uncharted on Film: Do It Right Or Go Home

As if that wasn't enough, at the Hollywood opening of Russell's new film The Fighter, a fan pleaded with the director to cast fan-favorite Nathan Fillion—a man who was clearly born to play Nathan Drake if ever there was one—in Russell's film. Russell's response was that he'd never heard of Fillion. "So you want him because he looks like that guy [Drake]?" the director asked. When the fan went on to briefly explain the similarities in mannerisms between Drake and his would-be real-life counterpart, Russell appeared to be learning this information for the first time.

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