The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Review
Xbox 360 | PS3 | PC
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Box Art
System: PC, PS3, Xbox 360
Dev: Bethesda Games Studios
Pub: Bethesda Games Studios
Release: November 11, 2011
Players: 1
Screen Resolution: 480p-1080p Blood and Gore, Intense Violence, Sexual Themes, Use of Alcohol
Exit Oblivion, Enter The Dragons
by Robert VerBruggen

As incredible as The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion was in 2006, it hasn't aged well. While it's still capable of hooking players into tens of hours of questing, it looks terrible, it crashes periodically, its load times are excruciating, and its combat is lame.

An update is due, and Bethesda didn't drop the ball when it came to Oblivion's successor, Skyrim. Every aspect of the game is improved, and while some areas fare better than others, there is no way to start playing Skyrim without being sucked into a massive, epic adventure that consumes weeks of your time. Even at full price, Skyrim is a steal.

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot

When you begin Skyrim, the first thing you will notice is that the new engine works wonders. This doesn't look like, say, Battlefield 3—there's no way a game this big could have that much detail—but it looks good, especially when you stare into the distance outdoors, and exploring the vast world that confronts you is a pleasure. The new graphical capabilities are especially noticeable when you talk to people; the camera no longer zooms in to reveal every awkward imperfection in the character models, and the lip-syncing has improved tenfold. The third-person view is actually usable, though it's still not the best way to play. And while it's probably not fair for me to compare load times—I played Oblivion on Xbox 360 from a disc, and Skyrim from a PC hard drive—I found traveling a lot more fun and less time consuming in Skyrim.

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A huge and pretty world is nothing without a story big enough to fill it, and Skyrim's plot, set 200 years after the events of Oblivion, is suitably epic. At the outset, you're a captive—just as you were in Oblivion—and just as you're about to be decapitated, a dragon attacks, giving you an opportunity to escape. It turns out that dragons are coming back from the dead, and you, as a "Dragonborn," are one of the few people who are able to kill them.

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot

The dragons are somewhat like Oblivion Gates—a recurring battle that appears across the land and rewards you handsomely when you win. Dragons are hardy but very beatable foes; even a melee-focused character can take one down, since they land on the ground frequently. Not only are dragon parts valuable, but you absorb some of each beast's essence, which improves your capacity to learn "shouts," special abilities that include everything from attacks to a fast sprint.

They are also like Oblivion Gates in that while they're the main focus of the plot, they are a very, very small part of the game as a whole. Like its predecessor, Skyrim takes a "play it your way" approach—you can rush through the story missions if you want, but you can also join guilds, perform random tasks for countless people in each town, raid dungeons, explore the huge territory you're given access to, or just walk around talking to everyone to learn their stories. The more you play different parts of the game, the more your character improves in those ways—basically customizing himself to your play style. If you don't feel like working your way into a certain guild, fine, don't bother. If you're like me and think the "crafting" system is boring—all it entails is bringing items to a crafting station and pressing a button to finish the job—just ignore it unless you have a weapon you really want to improve. On the other hand, if you finish all of Skyrim's content and want to keep going, the game offers an unlimited supply of simple, procedurally generated quests. In other words, Skyrim is carefully designed to let you do whatever you want without hitting roadblocks or running out of things to do.

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot

The system governing character improvement has been overhauled for the better. Oblivion was overly complicated, with too many abilities that were grouped into too many different categories. With Skyrim, by contrast, you make two simple choices whenever you level up: You increase your health, your magicka, or your stamina, and you choose a perk that improves a more specific ability. As in most RPGs, players will probably find it most effective to specialize in a few areas rather than trying to level everything up evenly. I found it worked well to make myself incredibly lethal with one-handed weapons while also improving my blocking and healing.

The combat has been improved, too, though it's still by far the weakest element of the game. Health regenerates, so you no longer have to rest for an hour every time you get away from your foes. You can equip whatever you want to your hands, but magic spells occupy a slot—meaning that you can dual wield, but you can no longer, for example, cast a healing spell while holding a shield and sword. Fortunately, you can set the weapons and spells you use most frequently to your "Favorites" and switch between them quickly, so it's still possible to cast a quick spell in the middle of an intense fighting match. Bows and arrows are much easier to use. And the combat has taken a grisly visual turn, with much more blood and even a "kill cam" that zooms out to show you exactly how brutally you're taking out some of the enemies.

Videos / Game Trailers
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim - Debut Trailer - click to enlarge

Debut Trailer
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim - Behind the Wall: The Making of Skyrim - click to enlarge

Behind the Wall: The Making of Skyrim
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim - The World of Skyrim - click to enlarge

The World of Skyrim
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim - The Concept Art of Skyrim - click to enlarge

The Concept Art of Skyrim
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim - The Animation of Skyrim - click to enlarge

The Animation of Skyrim

Screenshots / Images
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot - click to enlarge The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot - click to enlarge The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot - click to enlarge The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot - click to enlarge The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot - click to enlarge The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot - click to enlarge The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot - click to enlarge The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot - click to enlarge The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot - click to enlarge The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Screenshot - click to enlarge

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