Total War: Shogun 2 Review
Total War: Shogun 2 Box Art
System: PC
Dev: The Creative Assembly
Pub: SEGA
Release: March 15, 2011
Players: 1
Screen Resolution: 480p-1080p
Declaring Total War on Mediocrity
by Robert VerBruggen

The Total War community has been waiting with bated breath for Shogun 2. On one hand, the new game continues the tale of the franchise's well-regarded first entry. On the other, its developer, Creative Assembly, has been taking risks with the series of late, and a vocal minority of fans have disliked the results, especially Empire and Napoleon. The big question: Is Shogun 2 a return to form, or yet another title that will divide the Total War faithful?

Total War: Shogun 2 Screenshot

It is most definitely a return to form. In Shogun 2, the map is once again tight and focused, the setting is once again Japan, and yet the gameplay loses none of the staggering complexity it's built up over the years. For gamers who love figuring out how strategy games work -- from the best resource-management techniques to the tiny nuances of the AI's battle strategy -- Shogun 2 is a must-buy.

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Like all Total War games, Shogun 2 has a two-tiered gameplay model. The main tier is a turn-based strategy game something like Civilization IV. You start out in the aftermath of the Onin War as one faction among many, and your goal is to take over Japan. You have to make the most of your resources, put your cities to work creating military units, combine those units into armies, engage in diplomacy with rival powers, and even set tax rates that balance revenue-raising with citizen-pleasing. Special agents, including ninjas and geishas, return from the first Shogun; you can send them behind enemy lines to wreak all kinds of havoc. Your units level up with use.

Total War: Shogun 2 Screenshot

Unlike in Civilization IV, however, in Shogun 2 you can't just create a "stack of doom," tell it to attack the enemy, and be done with it. Whenever two armies meet on the battlefield, you're given the option of controlling the events in real time -- which, in addition to being fun, lets you turn the tables with clever strategy if you're out-gunned. During battles, you'll have to give each unit very specific instructions, from what direction to face, to what formation to stand in, to when to attack, to how to use its special abilities. (Archers, for example, can be set to "skirmish," in which case they shoot enemies at range, and then retreat when the bad guys get close.) The interface is fairly simple, and the various difficulty levels provide a well-balanced challenge for most gamers, but this will still be a bit too complicated for beginners.

Critics of recent Total War games will be glad to hear that the AI has seen some dramatic improvements. Your enemies' strategy will be random enough that you can never tell what's coming next, and they're quite able to surprise you in both gameplay tiers. If you leave a coastal city open to attack, a naval unit will stop by to invade; if you leave a flank unguarded in battle, the enemy will find a way to sneak through. Interestingly, once you start to gain steam in the campaign, the existing shogun will instruct all of the remaining clans to break their alliances and attack you at once, which seriously interrupts your momentum.

Total War: Shogun 2 Screenshot

There are countless smaller systems at work, too. If a unit runs too much in battle, it gets fatigued; if it loses too much ground to an enemy unit and you don't back it up, its morale crumbles and soldiers start to desert. If you break alliances, your honor declines, the other clans lose respect for you, and dealings with them become a lot harder. Instead of pursuing war all the time, you can accomplish various missions and earn benefits to use later. There's a tech tree divided between military power (Bushido) and civic development (Chi). You can make nice with the West, Christianize, and get access to gunpowder, but your fellow clans might not like that so much. In other words, virtually every decision you make will have several levels of risk and reward.

Screenshots / Images
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