SYSTEM
PSX

PRICE
$39.99

DEVELOPER
n-Space

PUBLISHER
Fox Interactive

RELEASE
03/00

Die Hard Trilogy 2: Viva Las Vegas Review

By: John Doe


The first Die Hard Trilogy developed by Probe and published by Fox in 1996, was a gaming masterpiece back then and is still one of those games fondly remembered for it's vision and execution. It featured three entirely different game engines (third person, first person, driving), that easily could have stood on their own as separate games. Die Hard Trilogy 2 tries hard to recapture the spirit of the first and comes up a little short in certain areas, especially the driving segments of the game. At the end of the day, DHT2 is a fun game with some flaws that just isn't as tight as the original.


Highs:
Lows:

If you haven't seen the latest three Die Hard movies that this game is based on, you're not alone. Actually, you haven't missed anything; the plot of the game, set in Vegas, the city that never sleeps (or is that my house? Don't ever have kids! Kidding! Kidding!!) just exists solely for this game's purpose. Once again, you star as Officer John McClane, who has knack for being in the wrong place at the right time. International terrorists are yada yada yada, who cares? Basically you shoot, shoot and shoot, and drive and then shoot some more. This time around, the game divides the three separate games more equally; first you play a third-person shooting level, then a first-person shooting level on tracks (you cannot alter your movement, the game moves you around and you go "bang bang" a lot) and then you are onto a driving level where you must find bombs, hit cars, deliver escaped felons to the police station etc. After the driving level, the process starts again with the third person level. If you are geared to one style more than another, Arcade mode allows you to choose the style of game you'd like to tackle. There are also Practice modes available, but they are over fairly quickly, and considering the level of difficulty isn't that great throughout the real game anyway, (certainly nowhere near the first DHT) you probably won't need it.

Graphically this game doesn't seem to have much polish. The scenes are all a little grainy and dark, making visibility difficult in the third person and driving games. Unfortunately this game takes place at night, and therefore turning up the contrast on your TV might be in order. The "clipping" (ability to see through walls) in the third person mode, although intentional is distracting as hell. It's like playing as Superman. There would be much more suspense if I couldn't see through every solid wall. Where's the thrill of the hunt? The good news is, is that just as in DHT all of the windows and machines can be shot and smashed, leaving a path of destruction behind you. As an added bonus there is also a first person view mode in the third person game, which allows for better targeting. It's just too bad you can't actually move in this mode. Absent this time out, is John's jumping ability; well kind of. John can jump but it's done automatically. Luckily jumping isn't too essential in the game.

The first person shooting game supports various gun controllers, but I made out just fine with the good old Dual Shock. The on-screen cursor moves at a good pace, and doesn't wiggle all over the place, making targeting a breeze for the most part. Everything is based on repetition in this part of the game. Enemies appear in the same spots all of the time, making the game an exercise in memory more than skill. I certainly appreciate DHT2 moving from one style to the next; doing so provides a welcome change of pace.

As mentioned, the weakest aspect of DHT2 is the driving game. The vehicles don't feel very responsive and the environments are pretty lackluster. As well, the darkness drops the visibility factor (due to draw in) to almost nil, sucking the life out of this aspect of the game. At least the missions are varied and somewhat interesting, but it comes off as a very weak Driver rip off and doesn't really succeed.

A talented Bruce Willis impersonator once again provides the voice of John McClane (and you thought you had a crappy job). He actually sounds good; it would fool me. I will say this, I'm glad the snappy patter is kept to a minimum. Voice samples tend to get overused (Gex anyone?) but at least the developers showed some restraint. The music is what you have come to expect; thumping techno-laced tunes that neither enhance or detract from the game.

The game features a large amount of levels per sector and 3 very bizarre bonus rounds that are quite amusing. The bonus first person shooter level is particularly amusing, especially for those who dislike mute street performers. Unfortunately, DHT2 doesn't have the spark that the first game had. It seems to be a sequel for sequels sake; if they liked the first one, here is more of the same. Being that the first game was made 4 years ago and is more enjoyable to play, I can't help feeling that DHT2 could have been so much more. It's fun, don't get me wrong, but rent this one first.

OVERALL
6.5

GRAPHICS
6.5

CONTROL
6.5

MUSIC/FX
7.0

FRUSTRATION
3.0


Second Opinion

By: Jane Doe

Die Hard Trilogy 2 tries hard to live up to the first game but doesn't quite make it. The graphics are grainier and much darker, the gameplay virtually identical to the first DHT and the driving portion of the game reminds me of Twisted Metal 1; as in 4 years ago. I liked the variety in levels and I found the game easier than the first but considering the original was made 4 years ago, there just should have been more to it. If you played the first one and liked it, rent this one and see if it's still your cup of tea.

OVERALL
5.5

GRAPHICS
6.0

CONTROL
5.5

MUSIC/FX
6.0

FRUSTRATION
3.0

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