Grand Slam Tennis Review
Grand Slam Tennisbox art
System: Wii Review Rating Legend
Dev: EA Canada 1.0 - 1.9 = Avoid 4.0 - 4.4 = Great
Pub: Electronic Arts 2.0 - 2.4 = Poor 4.5 - 4.9 = Must Buy
Release: Jun. 8, 2009 2.5 - 2.9 = Average 5.0 = The Best
Players: 1 3.0 - 3.4 = Fair
ESRB Rating: Everyone 3.5 - 3.9 = Good

There's been a lot of talk regarding Nintendo's Wii MotionPlus peripheral ever since it was announced last year. Isn't Nintendo just charging us for a functionality that was supposed to be included with the Wii to begin with? Would it really be worth shelling out 20 bucks a controller for the peripheral? Would there be enough games to really take advantage of the increased functionality? Well, after playing EA Sports' Grand Slam Tennis for the Wii, I think most people would agree that the existence of MotionPlus is fully justified.

Grand Slam Tennis screenshot

In terms of game structure, Grand Slam Tennis is very similar to just about every other sports game you've ever played. There are a variety of modes, but the major single-player offering is certainly the Career mode. In Career mode, you'll get to create your own character and then participate in the Wimbledon and the US, French, and Australian Opens as you attempt to win a Grand Slam. This set-up is generic and predictable, but it really just behaves as a framework for the extremely fun tennis matches that the game offers.

The reason that you'll want to play Grand Slam Tennis is for the controls. With the Wii MotionPlus accessory attached to the Wii Remote, you essentially have 1:1 control of your character and are able, with practice, to put the ball wherever you want on the court. This is without a doubt one of the most satisfying experiences in any sports game I've ever played. Most shots are controlled entirely with the Wii Remote, though drops and lobs require use of buttons. This is just a little bit off-putting, only because it breaks up the 1:1 control a bit. Still, it's not a huge deal and overall the game controls wonderfully.

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That said, Grand Slam Tennis does possess a learning curve, and it'll take awhile before you're able to really volley with some sense of confidence. Shots themselves are fairly intuitive; one of the more difficult aspects of this game to master is movement. Moving your character toward the ball with the Nunchuk's analog stick while simultaneously setting up a specific shot can be a little much to handle at first. Luckily, there's a practice mode where you can work on coordinating these two actions.

Grand Slam Tennis screenshot

There is also an option to have movement controlled automatically, for those who can't grasp the movement/shooting combination. Frankly, though, this takes away much of the fun of the game. To begin with, the A.I. for character movement isn't particularly consistent. Secondly, when you turn this function on, you're essentially reducing Grand Slam Tennis to a slightly more sophisticated version of Wii Sports tennis. That would be a shame, because Grand Slam Tennis is a very deep, fun tennis game and simplifying the title would be to ignore all it has to offer. Believe me when I say that spending the thirty minutes or hour it takes to really get good at this game is very much worth it.

Of course, in order to fully appreciate Grand Slam Tennis, you're going to need to shell out twenty dollars for the MotionPlus peripheral. As a gamer who generally operates on a budget, this left a bad taste in my mouth; however, after spending a good amount of time with Grand Slam Tennis, I'm convinced that the purchase was well worth it. In fact, after extensively playing the Career mode, I went out and bought a second MotionPlus accessory so that I could play multiplayer matches with friends. If you're looking for a justification to purchase MotionPlus, Grand Slam Tennis fits the bill.

Grand Slam Tennis screenshot

Interestingly, there is an option to play Grand Slam Tennis sans MotionPlus, but doing so is foolish. You lose the wonderful ball control that comes along with MotionPlus, and, again, Grand Slam Tennis essentially just becomes a fifty-dollar version of Wii Sports tennis. Admittedly, really appreciating this game is going to require a significant investment: the fifty dollar game plus at least one twenty dollar MotionPlus peripheral. Frankly, once you really get into Grand Slam Tennis, you're likely to invest in a few more accessories to take advantage of the local multiplayer options.

Screenshots / Images
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