Dragon Ball Z for Kinect Preview
Dragon Ball Z for Kinect Box Art
System: Xbox 360
Dev: NAMCO Bandai
Pub: NAMCO Bandai
Release: October 9, 2012
Players: 1-2
Screen Resolution: 480p-1080p Blood, Cartoon Violence, Mild Language
Another Dragon Ball Z Flail-Fest
by Angelo M. D’Argenio

Remember MoCap Boxing, that motion-controlled boxing game that made a splash in arcades in the early 2000s? It was pretty cool, but was mostly stationary. You threw punches and kicks, and bobbed and weaved to dodge the enemy's attacks, but you had no control over the movement of your character. Essentially, you were just standing in place, flailing like a madman. This is pretty much exactly what Dragon Ball Z for Kinect is all about.

The game lets you choose from one of thirty characters from the Dragon Ball Z universe and control them in first-person perspective against their bitter rivals. For example, one of Goku's opponents is Frieza, who comes with all the silly monologues about what a frustrating monkey he is and how the planet is going to blow up in five minutes.

Dragon Ball Z for Kinect Screenshot

During normal gameplay, your job is to flail your arms and legs to reduce your opponent's life gauge. Much like MoCap Boxing, there appear to be certain points when your opponent is actually vulnerable, but the rest of the time they'll just dodge and counter all of your moves. So most of the game is actually just a slow grind, getting in damage when you can and avoiding damage when it comes your way.

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As far as special moves go, you don't appear to have access to them at all times. Instead, when the battle progresses far enough, you'll get an onscreen prompt to do a special move motion. To the game's credit, these motions do actually appear to mimic the true motions of DBZ characters. The Kamehameha, for example, asks you to crouch down with your hands behind you before thrusting them forward to fire the beam. This is probably the coolest part of the game, sure to make fanboys squeal with delight. However, the limited usefulness of special moves turns them into gigantic quick time events. Sure, they may have novelty value the first few times you throw a gigantic beam, but I'm guessing this will get tedious by the fifteenth time.

Dragon Ball Z for Kinect Screenshot

Speaking of quick time events, they are all over the place in this game. When your opponent uses a special move, you have to bend and duck at the right times to avoid it. The same thing goes for your opponent's normal attacks, but these are more evenly dispersed throughout gameplay and feel less like "follow the onscreen prompt to not die." Sometimes your attacks will clash, which prompts you to, once again, flail your arms in order to increase the power of your attack. I would think that this breaks the immersion of the game, considering Goku never pumped his arms like a wild man to increase the power of the Kamehameha.

Dragon Ball Z for Kinect Screenshot

In fact, it appears as if NAMCO Bandai has missed one important aspect of DBZ fandom: screaming like a nutcase. There is absolutely no voice control in this game, which is a shame considering the Kinect is fully capable of it. It would have been awesome if you could use your super moves at all times just by shouting a voice prompt. When beams clash, it would have been great if you could increase the strength by yelling rather than pumping your fists. Then again, this would probably keep your neighbors up at night.

Screenshots / Images
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