WarioWare D.I.Y. Review
WarioWare D.I.Y. box art
System: DS Review Rating Legend
Dev: Intelligent Systems 1.0 - 1.9 = Avoid 4.0 - 4.4 = Great
Pub: Nintendo 2.0 - 2.4 = Poor 4.5 - 4.9 = Must Buy
Release: March 28, 2010 2.5 - 2.9 = Average 5.0 = The Best
Players: 1 3.0 - 3.4 = Fair
ESRB Rating: Everyone 3.5 - 3.9 = Good
Do Whatcha Gotta Do
by Maria Montoro

I've played so many WarioWare games throughout the years that the novelty has worn off a little. It truly was one of my favorite games back in the days of the GameCube, but after a while, the new micro-game collections didn't have a whole lot more to offer, save for the Wii's WarioWare: Smooth Moves, which employed fun yet slightly unpolished motion controls and more original micro-games.

WarioWare D.I.Y. screenshot

Luckily, Nintendo and Intelligent Systems have brought a whole new idea into the mix with WarioWare D.I.Y. This time around, you don't just get to play games; you get to create them. The title still includes 90 premade micro-games that you can play at any time, one at a time, or mixed up in play sessions within the "Game Blender." These titles are split up into categories, depending upon their creator. You'll see a few familiar faces here; everyone got back to work and created games that match their taste and personality. Mona's all into weird games, while Jimmy T. brings in his sports specialty. Ashley the Witch, more sinister than ever, couldn't be more into food stuff, and then there's Orbulon, 18-Volt, Dribble and Spitz, etc. with their own cadre of games as well.

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These games all make use of the stylus controls, steering away from the classic D-pad / face button controls found in some of the WarioWare: Touched micro-games. In WarioWare D.I.Y., most games require a tap or two to select the right choice, fix what's wrong, move, hit something, or jump. While some of the games will look familiar, there isn't as much repetition of old games this time around as there was in previous titles. Most of the 90 offerings feel fresh and new, presenting new challenge within a well-known formula. As always, each stage includes a few rounds of micro-games, as well as boss battles consisting of shooting some pool, making an edible sandwich, or even solving a slide puzzle. I have to admit it took me a while to get the hang of some of the micro-games, and even longer to beat some of the stages, but it's nice to finally find some challenge in WarioWare. Fortunately, the game doesn't make you beat each level before unlocking new stages. The more you do in the game, the more levels you unlock, but it doesn't have to be just playing.

WarioWare D.I.Y. screenshot

Like I said, the most innovative addition to this title is the creation mode. You can enter WarioWare Inc.'s D.I.Y. 101 tutorials, Assembly Dojo, and Job Center in order to learn how to create games, complete assembly challenges that teach you a few extra tricks, and let your creative juices flow while drawing cool items for premade micro-games. There's also the D.I.Y. Studio with the Super MakerMatic, which is where you create your very own games from scratch. You get to design the background, the characters and objects on the screen, and the script. Following a few "simple" rules, you can create commands and actions for each of the game's elements. For example, you can tell a character to run when you tap it, a light to go on when the character reaches a certain spot within the canvas, or something to break when something else touches it.

Of course, this is an easy way to put it, but the truth is, creating games is not so simple. If you have the mind for it, you will be able to create very neat things and put cool ideas into practice, but it will take lots of time and effort to really make it happen. It's easier than creating a game in Adobe Flash, but not by a whole lot, I have to say. The best part about it is that the interface is fairly straightforward and easy to use. If you've toyed around with the DSi's Flipnote Studio, you can get an idea of what it's like, though it might be even easier. Objects can be drawn, copied and recreated into a new canvas, traced by following a faint image of the previous canvas, etc. You can even use stamps with premade objects, make your own stamps and textures, or import items from existing micro-games. There are plenty of ways to make things easier, even if not easy enough for the less patient users.

WarioWare D.I.Y. screenshot

As if that wasn't enough, each game you make needs its own music. Again, you can import it from another title, create your own from scratch, or use a little help from the master, who will give you music tracks adapted to your request. Whether you're in the mood for fast-paced tunes, scary tracks, or whatever it may be, he'll come up with something interesting. You can also attach sound effects to the game's actions, creating a bit of ambiance.

Screenshots / Images
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