Let's Tap Review
Let's Tap box art
System: Wii Review Rating Legend
Dev: Prope 1.0 - 1.9 = Avoid 4.0 - 4.4 = Great
Pub: SEGA 2.0 - 2.4 = Poor 4.5 - 4.9 = Must Buy
Release: Jun. 16, 2009 2.5 - 2.9 = Average 5.0 = The Best
Players: 1-4 3.0 - 3.4 = Fair
ESRB Rating: Everyone 3.5 - 3.9 = Good

Let's Tap is a very interesting title. While the game boasts an all-new control mechanism, at first glance you wouldn't think this would involve tapping your fingertips and palms on a box you had lying around the house. Even though this sounds bad on paper, and I certainly had my reservations about this title prior to playing, once I got over the awkwardness of playing my Wii with a box, I actually started having some considerable fun.

Let's Tap screenshot

As you may have guessed from the title, this game is all about the tapping. You play by placing your Wii-mote on top of a box and tapping. Although any box will do, I tested out several boxes for... ahem… tapability, and I found that not all boxes are created equal for Let's Tap.

First, I tried an old DDR mat box with the mat still in it. I thought the box's size and squishy interior would make for an ideal tap surface. However, I was quite mistaken. Using the DDR box made the game a lot less responsive, and I found that some of my small taps were not even registering. Next, I tried an old Amazon.com shipping box (with nothing inside) this worked very well, as it provided a nice rigid surface with which to tap. However, the best tapping surface I tried out had to be an old board game box. This box gave me plenty of tapping real estate, and it also provided just the right amount of feedback. From testing out all these different boxes, I think I can postulate that if you decide to give Let's Tap a try, you will need a box that is hollow on the inside, with a thin tapping surface but a wide construction.

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Once I found my ideal tapping surface, I have to say that I was impressed with the overall tap mechanic. The game never really calls for anything beyond a light, medium, or firm tap, and I never had any trouble with the controls, which was a very nice surprise.

Let's Tap screenshot

Even though the centerpiece of this game is its box-tapping mechanism, you won't have very much fun if there's nothing to tap to. Let's Tap features four distinct mini-games that you can play with your box, as well as a visualizer that lets you tap out cool designs and funky patterns.

The first game (and probably the best to get into early on) is Tap Runner. This mini-game plays a bit like Track and Field, and it puts you on an astronomically set course where you must jump hurdles, walk tightropes, and avoid obstacles that may crash down on you. You tap light to jog, moderately to run, and firmly to jump. There are about 20 levels, and you can play with up to three friends. This mini-game is fairly fun, but after the first few levels, just running and jumping gets a little monotonous.

Let's Tap screenshot

The next mini-game is the one I think most people saw coming. It is a drum simulator known as Rhythm Tap. This takes high energy dance tunes (think DDR) and gives you a beat to tap out. Icons that flash across the screen will let you know whether you should be tapping softly, normally, or firmly, and there are special icons that indicate rapid tapping or accelerated tap strength. However, much like Tap Runner, after the first few levels I found myself increasingly bored with Rhythm Tap.

Screenshots / Images
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